The Biggest Fitness Myth

A large portion of our general population clientele work out to improve body composition and burn fat. Many of these people come to us seeking professional advice after they have already tried countless hours of cardio, boot camp, boxing, etc.

 

Most of the people are shocked at what comes next. I say you haven’t lost weight because you have not been in a caloric deficit and you are not lifting weights. That’s right, the key to fat loss is lifting weights and if you are not resistance training then you are going nowhere fast.

 

Many people believe that high amounts of cardio and light weights with very high reps is the key to fat loss. They are wrong. There are 2 factors at play as to why cardio based fitness regimes stop working.

 

The first problem is that many of these large corporate, boot camp style classes have no aspect of progressive overload. They sell you on the fancy heart rate monitors and the fact that they have you sweating and feeling tired. Novices will lose weight at first and think that this style of training works very well but they will inevitably plateau. Your body is an amazing machine and it becomes very efficient at whatever movements you are performing. Eventually, running on the treadmill and doing circuit style training with extremely light weights will stop working. Your body has become accustomed to the workout and the only way it will progress is through progressive overload. When the intensity, volume, duration, or nature of exercise doesn’t change, NEITHER DO YOU.

 

The second piece of the problem is that many people focus on the number of calories burnt during the session rather than the number of calories burnt 24-48 hours after the workout. Smart, periodized resistance training is extremely challenging on your body. It takes much more time to repair after lifting than performing cardio. While your body is repairing from an intense resistance training session it is burning through more calories. The best part is you can continue to make progress utilizing progressive overload while resistance training. I would rather burn 1,000 calories over 24 hours than 600 in 1 hour and if your goal is improving your body composition you should too!

 

How are you doing with your fitness goals?

 

If you need some help we would love for you to book a no sweat intro, where we meet to discuss YOUR GOALS and develop a plan to help you reach them.

 

BOOK YOUR NO SWEAT INTRO HERE

 

In health,

 

Graham